PulsePoint Group
August 21, 2009

Check out this video from Socialnomics.net for some compelling statistics on just how big the impact of social media really is.

Read more

One of the findings in practically every recent study on social media is that in older companies cutting edge social media initiatives are sometimes harder to get off the ground because of the powerful muscle memory formed from years of success.  But, as many communicators in these companies undoubtedly know, the way we operate is changing and communicators at all levels of the corporate world find themselves fighting that muscle memory of broadcast-style push communications techniques.  Certainly this generalization doesn’t apply to every company; it may not even apply to most, but for some it seems a formidable challenge.

But support for the social media buy-in proposition is coming from an unlikely source … the U.S. Army.

A recent New York Times piece explored a new pilot program of wikis launched by the Army for developing a number of its field manuals.  These “rules of the road” documents were historically written by military thinkers at the various educational and training institutions across the country.  The pilot program allows for editing and adding content by any active soldier, from Private to General, using technology similar to Wikipedia while requiring that each entry be attributed to someone.

Read more

With many economic indicators pointing to at least the beginning of the end of one of the greatest recessions since the Great Depression, is it finally time to start examining what life might look like on the other side of the downturn? Is it too early to start injecting hope back into your organization? Does your CEO have a new story to tell about the next chapter in your company's history? Is there an agreement on a growth strategy? These questions are worth asking now, or soon, even if we believe the economic turnaround is still a couple of quarters away.

Why? Well, you wouldn't think it would be too difficult to get senior leadership to start projecting a positive future, if indeed things are beginning to look a little brighter. But, the fact is that leadership teams find it far more difficult to get focused early on telling the positive story, than they do when the news is all doom and gloom. There is something about a deep dive in financial performance, severe lay offs and waning sales that focus a leadership team with laser like precision. It's far more difficult, particularly in the early stages of the rebound. Why?

Read more
PulsePoint Group
August 7, 2009

In the old world, press releases were the preferred route to communicate important messages about your business or organization. Quarterly earnings? Press release. New board member? Press release. New product? Sure, there may be a blog or video, but typically only after the press release.

Then the higher powers (those brainiacs from Harvard, MIT and Stanford) created Web 2.0.

Now, some employee can catch wind of something, blog about it anonymously and it shows up in your Google alert with your company’s name on it. And changing your Network on Facebook is basically sending a press release to your friends saying “Hey! I changed jobs/cities!” Subsequent wall postings with “congrats” and “what next?” are to be expected.

In essence, the press release’s main job – to share previously withheld information with the public – is no longer one of exclusivity.

Read more

Paul Argenti, professor in Dartmouth's Tuck School of Business, on the greatest resistance to adopting social media inside most companies -- fear of losing control.

Read more